Farm life, Seasonal

Didn’t forget

No, we were at a family wedding that took place on Friday. It was a gorgeous day in the middle of nowhere (best place to be) but it’s hard to be away from home. First of all there is that feeling that if I have a week… oh the things I could get done if I was at home. And second – the food. Oh the food. Rich, delicious but celebration food, not meant to be eaten for such a long stretch.

So now it’s catch up (and by catch up I clearly mean procrastination given that I’m here and not doing any of the things that need to be done) and heal. I have a cold that was going away but took advantage of my weakened state to resurge and I have to get my diet back to normal. It was a good experience though, it made me realize just how easily it is to get re-acclimated to unhealthy eating.

The good news however (because that up there felt like a bit of TMI whining!) is that we have got hay in, half of the straw we need and a new goat shed. Well, it needs a roof but most of a new goat shed. J has been busting it to get all of the fall chores underway now that we’re no longer besieged by wasps. The woodshed too, is filling quickly. Good things all, because autumn may be shorter than usual. We’ve had a wintery bite to the wind and wintery looking clouds.

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Now to start some beans soaking for tomorrow night’s supper and hopefully today I’ll get some fall gardening done. All of the interloper chickens (well, except Elegant, the mother hen) were caught last night and had their feathers trimmed to prevent further forays into the garden. Maybe, just maybe, this will allow me some success with the fall crops that are bursting out of their trays in the greenhouse?

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Chickens, Ducks, Farm life, Food preservation, goats

Another post, are you kidding? (or… the many methods of procrastination)

Well, there is too much to do today. How do I know when the day is so young I shouldn’t know how it will unfold? Simple. Not only do I know that I have about a dozen chickens to process this morning (before it gets hot) I have this:
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lovely box of onions and garlic to process.

And two of these:
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to turn into kraut. That picture, by the way, does not do them justice.

And yes, there is an epic box of plums waiting to have something done to them, remaining pears also waiting for something (jam or dehydrating, not sure which), more rosehips to pick and process. Which reminds me, I found the best link for dealing with the little hairs:

http://www.eatweeds.co.uk/how-to-dry-store-rose-hips-rosa-canina

I cannot wait to have the time to cruise through this site. It’s one that I think I would really enjoy.

So, there is also the garden to be dealt with. Lots of weeding is needed as well as preparing for winter crops. And getting hay and mucking out and and and. I am often asked how I manage to get everything done and the simple answer is that I don’t. I am always prioritizing what can’t wait (like the meat birds). I have a good month until the first real frost so there’s time for rosehips, garden beds are a higher priority, as is the fruit but likely I’ll just ask for all hands on deck to help with it and we’ll manage. If we don’t, the fruit becomes eggs by way of the chickens and ducks so I am always inclined to remember that on a farm (no matter how small) all is rarely lost.

Now, I suppose I ought to get to it.

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